Share
 
Comments

Dear Friends,

After the results of the 2012 Gujarat Vidhan Sabha were declared and in between the massive preparations of the 2013 Vibrant Gujarat Global Summit, I attended a very important function in Gandhinagar. The occasion was the flagging off of the Torch Rally for Khel Mahakumbh 2012-2013. Usually we have the Khel Mahakumbh, our annual sports extravaganza, in November but the Model Code of Conduct did not permit us to do the same in 2012. Hence, the Khel Mahakumbh commences today, on 18th January.

In this edition of the Khel Mahakumbh, we expect to see a record participation from athletes cutting across all age groups. Already over 24 lakh athletes including over 1 lakh specially abled athletes have registered for 20 sporting events, which is far higher than the 18-lakh participants we had during Khel Mahakumbh 2011. The Torch Rally itself has moved around the length and breadth of the state for the last 18 days to further popularize the Khel Mahakumbh. Being the 150th birth year of Swami Vivekananda, the Gujarat Government set up Vivekananda Yuva Kendras in the last one year, which will provide a great impetus to the Khel Mahakumbh.

Initiatives such as Khel Mahakumbh are not merely sports meets where players come, play and leave; this is not a one-off event held to fill the calendar of the Government. In reality, the Khel Mahakumbh is an integral part of a larger determination of the Government to promote a culture of sports and sportsmanship among the people of Gujarat.

I have noticed that due to pressures of books, education, classes etc. the sports fields wear a desolate look during the evenings. This is a far cry from our times, when were eagerly awaited an evening game as much as we awaited a stimulating lecture. This is a matter of concern. The wide availability of video games, computer games and television have made the home a much better place of recreation as compared to the field.

This reminds me of a similar situation about which I had read about- in China it was noticed that after coming back from school, little children preferred to watch cartoons instead of going out to play. That is when the authorities decided not to screen any cartoon during a certain time so that the children go on the field.

We must make sports an integral part of our lives. It is a fact that without sport there can be no sportsman spirit. It is also rightly said,
“Jo Khele, Woh Khile” (The person who plays, shines!).
We need not be professionals at the sport we play but picking up one sport as a hobby is something that can do wonders for our overall personal development.

We have decided to leave no stone unturned to promote every aspect of sports development. Our efforts are not limited to creating only talented players. There is an immense Human Resource Development potential linked with sports and we want that to grow leaps and bounds. Why cant we think of empowering umpiring skills, refereeing skills, encourage all the youngsters who are part of the proceedings without being on the field? There is scope for immense growth in areas of sports medicine, sports journalism and sports infrastructure. Our Sports Policy looks at all these issues comprehensively. We have also come up with a Sports Academy and are working towards creating Sports Schools in every district. We need to go further ahead and scale new heights of glory and give our youngsters the opportunity to shine on the sports field.

Apart from the Khel Mahakumbh, I invite you to be a part of Kutch Desert Car Rally 2013 that will be held on 25th January 2013. The Desert Car Rally has been a unique inititative to promote tourism and adventure sports in Kutch and in the past few editions it has really grown to spectacular heights.

Gujarat has just witnessed the Kumbh of development during the 2013 Vibrant Gujarat Summit. At the same time the Maha Kumbh is underway at Prayag and today I invite every one of you to extend your participation and support during this Mahakumbh of sports and sportsmanship. Those of you who are not playing should go to the venues and encourage the athletes. Breathe in their passion, their dedication and their determination. Victory and defeat are not the only aspects of sports. What is more important is the healthy atmosphere of sportsman spirit and this is what we seek to do during the Khel Mahakumbh, with the Mantra of
‘Ramshe Gujarat, Jeetshe Gujarat’ (Gujarat will play, Gujarat will win). So, come and be a part of this Mahakumbh of sports development!

Jay Jay Garvi Gujarat

Narendra Modi

Modi Govt's #7YearsOfSeva
Explore More
It is now time to leave the 'Chalta Hai' attitude & think of 'Badal Sakta Hai': PM Modi

Popular Speeches

It is now time to leave the 'Chalta Hai' attitude & think of 'Badal Sakta Hai': PM Modi
During tough times, PM Modi acts as 'Sankatmochak', stands by people in times of need

Media Coverage

During tough times, PM Modi acts as 'Sankatmochak', stands by people in times of need
...

Nm on the go

Always be the first to hear from the PM. Get the App Now!
...
Why India and the World Need Gandhi
October 02, 2019
Share
 
Comments

The great leader envisioned a world where every citizen has dignity and prosperity.

Upon reaching India in 1959, the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. remarked, “To other countries I may go as a tourist, but to India I come as a pilgrim”. He added, “Perhaps, above all, India is the land where the techniques of nonviolent social change were developed that my people have used in Montgomery, Alabama, and elsewhere throughout the American South. We have found them to be effective and sustaining — they work!”

The guiding light whose inspiration got Dr. King to India was Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi, the Mahatma, the Great Soul. On Wednesday, we observe his 150th birth anniversary. Gandhi Ji, or Bapu, continues to give courage to millions globally.

Gandhian methods of resistance ignited a spirit of hope among several African nations. Dr. King remarked: “When I was visiting in Ghana, West Africa, Prime Minister Nkrumah told me that he had read the works of Gandhi and felt that nonviolent resistance could be extended there. We recall that South Africa has had bus boycotts also.”

Nelson Mandela referred to Gandhi as “the Sacred Warrior” and wrote, “His strategy of noncooperation, his assertion that we can be dominated only if we cooperate with our dominators, and his nonviolent resistance inspired anticolonial and antiracist movements internationally in our century.”

For Mr. Mandela, Gandhi was Indian and South African. Gandhi would have approved. He had the unique ability to become a bridge between some of the greatest contradictions in human society.

In 1925, Gandhi wrote in “Young India”: “It is impossible for one to be internationalist without being a nationalist. Internationalism is possible only when nationalism becomes a fact, i.e., when peoples belonging to different countries have organized themselves and are able to act as one man.” He envisioned Indian nationalism as one that was never narrow or exclusive but one that worked for the service of humanity.

Mahatma Gandhi also epitomized trust among all sections of society. In 1917, Ahmedabad in Gujarat witnessed a huge textile strike. When the conflict between the mill workers and owners escalated to a point of no return, it was Gandhi who mediated an equitable settlement.

Gandhi formed the Majoor Mahajan Sangh, an association for workers’ rights. At first sight, it may seem just another name of an organization but it reveals how small steps created a large impact. During those days, “Mahajan” was used as a title of respect for elites. Gandhi inverted the social structure by attaching the name “Mahajan” to “Majoor,” or laborers. With that linguistic choice, Gandhi enhanced the pride of workers.

And Gandhi combined ordinary objects with mass politics. Who else could have used a charkha, a spinning wheel, and khadi, Indian homespun cloth, as symbols of economic self-reliance and empowerment for a nation?

Who else could have created a mass agitation through a pinch of salt! During colonial rule, Salt Laws, which placed a new tax on Indian salt, had become a burden. Through the Dandi March in 1930, Gandhi challenged the Salt Laws. His picking up a small lump of natural salt from the Arabian Sea shore led to the historic civil disobedience movement.

There have been many mass movements in the world, many strands of the freedom struggle even in India, but what sets apart the Gandhian struggle and those inspired by him is the wide-scale public participation. He never held administrative or elected office. He was never tempted by power.

For him, independence was not absence of external rule. He saw a deep link between political independence and personal empowerment. He envisioned a world where every citizen has dignity and prosperity. When the world spoke about rights, Gandhi emphasized duties. He wrote in “Young India”: “The true source of rights is duty. If we all discharge our duties, rights will not be far to seek.” He wrote in the journal Harijan, “Rights accrue automatically to him who duly performs his duties.”

Gandhi gave us the doctrine of trusteeship, which emphasized the socio-economic welfare of the poor. Inspired by that, we should think about a spirit of ownership. We, as inheritors of the earth, are responsible for its well-being, including that of the flora and fauna with whom we share our planet.

In Gandhi, we have the best teacher to guide us. From uniting those who believe in humanity to furthering sustainable development and ensuring economic self-reliance, Gandhi offers solutions to every problem.

We in India are doing our bit. India is among the fastest when it comes to eliminating poverty. Our sanitation efforts have drawn global attention. India is also taking the lead in harnessing renewable resources through efforts like the International Solar Alliance, which has brought together several nations to leverage solar energy for a sustainable future. We want to do even more, with the world and for the world.

As a tribute to Gandhi, I propose what I call the Einstein Challenge. We know Albert Einstein’s famous words on Gandhi: “Generations to come will scarce believe that such a one as this ever in flesh and blood walked upon this earth.”

How do we ensure the ideals of Gandhi are remembered by future generations? I invite thinkers, entrepreneurs and tech leaders to be at the forefront of spreading Gandhi’s ideas through innovation.

Let us work shoulder to shoulder to make our world prosperous and free from hate, violence and suffering. That is when we will fulfill Mahatma Gandhi’s dream, summed up in his favorite hymn, “Vaishnava Jana To,” which says that a true human is one who feels the pain of others, removes misery and is never arrogant.

The world bows to you, beloved Bapu!