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The Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs, chaired by Prime Minister Shri Narendra Modi, has approved the increase in the Minimum Support Prices (MSPs) for all mandated Kharif crops for marketing season 2021-22.

Government has increased the MSP of Kharif crops for marketing season 2021-22, to ensure remunerative prices to the growers for their produce. The highest absolute increase in MSP over the previous year has been recommended for sesamum (Rs. 452 per quintal) followed by tur and urad (Rs. 300 per quintal each). In case of groundnut and nigerseed, there has been an increase of Rs 275 per quintal and Rs 235 per quintal respectively in comparison to last year. The differential remuneration is aimed at encouraging crop diversification.

Minimum Support Prices for all Kharif crops for marketing season 2021-22 are as follows:

 

Crop

 

MSP 2020-21

 

MSP 2021-22

 

Cost* of production 2021-22 (Rs/quintal)

 

Increase in MSP

(Absolute)

 

Return over cost (in per cent)

 

Paddy (Common)

 

1868

 

1940

 

1293

 

72

 

50

 

Paddy (GradeA)^

 

A)A

 

1888

 

1960

 

-

 

72

 

-

 

Jowar (Hybrid) (Hybrid)

 

2620

 

2738

 

1825

 

118

 

50

 

Jowar (Maldandi)^

 

2640

 

2758

 

-

 

118

 

-

 

Bajra

 

2150

 

2250

 

1213

 

100

 

85

 

Ragi

 

3295

 

3377

 

2251

 

82

 

50

 

Maize

 

1850

 

1870

 

1246

 

20

 

50

 

Tur (Arhar)

 

6000

 

6300

 

3886

 

300

 

62

 

Moong

 

7196

 

7275

 

4850

 

79

 

50

 

Urad

 

6000

 

6300

 

3816

 

300

 

65

 

Groundnut

 

5275

 

5550

 

3699

 

275

 

50

 

Sunflower Seed

 

5885

 

6015

 

4010

 

130

 

50

 

Soyabean (yellow)

 

3880

 

3950

 

2633

 

70

 

50

 

Sesamum

 

6855

 

7307

 

4871

 

452

 

50

 

Nigerseed

 

6695

 

6930

 

4620

 

235           

 

50

 

Cotton (Medium Staple)

 

5515

 

5726

 

3817

 

211

 

50

 

Cotton (Long Staple)^

 

5825

 

6025

 

-

 

200

 

-

 

 

* Refers to comprehensive cost which includes all paid on costs such as those incurred on account of hired human labour, bullock labour machine labour, rent paid for leased in land, expenses incurred on use of material inputs like seeds, fertilizers, manures, irrigation charges, depreciation on implements and farm buildings, interest on working capital, diesel/electricity for operation of pump sets etc., miscellaneous expenses and imputed value of family labour.

^ Cost data are not separately compiled for Paddy (Grade A), Jowar (Maldandi) and Cotton (Long staple)

The increase in MSP for Kharif Crops for marketing season 2021-22 is in line with the Union Budget 2018-19 announcement of fixing the MSPs at a level of at least 1.5 times of the All-India weighted average Cost of Production (CoP), aiming at reasonably fair remuneration for the farmers. The expected returns to farmers over their cost of production are estimated to be highest in case of Bajra (85%) followed by urad (65%) and tur (62%). For rest of the crops, return to farmers over their cost of production is estimated to be at least 50%.

Concerted efforts were made over the last few years to realign the MSPs in favour of oilseeds, pulses and coarse cereals to encourage farmers shift to larger area under these crops and adopt best technologies and farm practices, to correct demand - supply imbalance. The added focus on nutri-rich nutri-cereals is to incentivize its production in the areas where rice-wheat cannot be grown without long term adverse implications for groundwater table.

Besides, the Umbrella Scheme "Pradhan Mantri AnnadataAaySanraksHan Abhiyan' (PM-AASHA) announced by the government in 2018 will aid in providing remunerative return to farmers for their produce. The Umbrella Scheme consists of three sub-schemes i.e. Price Support Scheme (PSS), Price Deficiency Payment Scheme (PDPS) and Private Procurement & Stockist Scheme (PPSS) on a pilot basis.

With an aim to attain self-sufficiency in the production of pulses, a special Kharif strategy has been prepared for implementation in the ensuing Kharif 2021 season. A detailed plan for both area expansion and productivity enhancement for Tur, Moong, and Urad has been formulated. Under the strategy, all the available high-yielding varieties (HYVs) of seeds will be distributed free of cost to increase area through intercropping and sole crop. Similarly, for Oilseeds, the Government of India has approved an ambitious plan for the free distribution of high-yielding varieties of seeds to the farmers for the Kharif season 2021 in the form of mini-kits. The special Kharif program will bring an additional 6.37 lakh hectare area under oilseeds and is likely to produce 120.26 lakh quintals of oilseeds and edible oil amounting to 24.36 lakh quintals.

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Where convention fails, innovation helps: PM Modi
June 16, 2021
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Stresses the need for insulating our planet against the next pandemic
During the pandemic digital technology helped us cope, connect, comfort and console: PM
Disruption does not have to mean despair, we must keep the focus on the twin foundations of repair and prepare: PM
The challenges our planet faces can only be overcome with a collective spirit and a human centric approach: PM
This pandemic is not only a test of our resilience, but also of our imagination. It is a chance to build a more inclusive, caring and sustainable future for all: PM
India is home to one of the world's largest start-up eco systems, India offers what innovators and investors need: PM
I invite the world to invest in India based on the five pillars of: Talent, Market, Capital, Eco-system and, Culture of openness: PM
France and Europe are our key partners, our partnerships must serve a larger purpose in service of humanity: PM

Excellency, my good friend President Macron,

Mr. Maurice Levy, Chairman of the Publicis Group,

Participants from around the world,

Namaste!

Congratulations to the organisers for successfully organising Vivatech in this difficult time.

This platform reflects the technological vision of France. India and France have been working closely on a wide range of subjects. Among these, technology and digital are emerging areas of cooperation. It is the need of the hour that such cooperation continues to grow further. It will not only help our nations but also the world at large.

Many youngsters saw the French Open with great enthusiasm. One of India's tech companies, Infosys provided tech support for the tournament. Likewise, the French Company Atos is involved in a project for making the fastest super computer in India. Whether it is France's Capgemini or India's TCS and Wipro, our IT talent is serving companies and citizens all over the world.

Friends,

I believe - Where convention fails, innovation can help. This has been seen during the COVID-19 global pandemic, which is the biggest disruption of our age. All nations have suffered loss and felt anxiety about the future. COVID-19 put many of our conventional methods to test. However, it was innovation that came to the rescue. By innovation I refer to:

Innovation before the pandemic .

Innovation during the pandemic .

When I speak about innovation before the pandemic, I refer to the pre-existing advances which helped us during the pandemic. Digital technology helped us cope, connect, comfort and console. Through digital media, we could work, talk with our loved ones, and help others. India's universal and unique bio-metric digital identity system - Aadhar - helped us to provide timely financial support to the poor. We could supply free food to 800 million people, and deliver cooking-fuel subsidies to many households. We in India were able to operationalise two public digital education programes- Swayam and Diksha - in quick time to help students.

The second part, innovation for the pandemic refers to how humanity rose to the occasion and made the fight against it more effective. In this, the role of our start-up sector, has been paramount. Let me give you India's example. When the pandemic hit our shores, we had inadequate testing capacities and shortage of masks, PPE, Ventilators and other such equipment. Our private sector played a key role in addressing this shortage. Our doctors adopted tele-medicine in a big way so that some COVID and other non-COVID issues could be addressed virtually. Two vaccines are being made in India and more are in the development or trial stage. On the Government side, our indigenous IT platform, Arogya-Setu enabled effective contact tracing. Our COWIN digital platform has already helped ensure vaccines to millions. Had we not been innovating, then our fight against COVID-19 would have been much weaker. We must not abandon this innovative zeal so that we are even better prepared when the next challenge strikes.

Friends,

India's strides in the world of tech and start-up are well-known. Our nation is home to one of the world's largest start-up eco systems. Several unicorns have come up in the recent years. India offers what innovators and investors need. I invite the world to invest in India based on the five pillars of: Talent, Market, Capital, Eco-system and, Culture of openness.

Indian tech-talent pool is famous across the world. Indian youth have given tech solutions to some of the world's most pressing problems. Today, India has One Point One eight billion mobile phones and Seven Seventy-Five million internet users. This is more than the population of several nations. Data consumption in India is among the highest and cheapest in the world. Indians are the largest users of social media. There is a diverse and extensive market that awaits you.

Friends,

This digital expansion is being powered by creating state-of-the-art public digital infrastructure. Five hundred and twenty-three thousand kilometres of fibre optic network already links our One hundred and fifty six thousand village councils. Many more are being connected in the times to come. Public wi-fi networks across the country are coming up. Likewise, India is working actively to nurture a culture of innovation. There are state-of-the-art innovation labs in Seven Thousand Five Hundred schools under the Atal Innovation Mission. Our students are taking part in numerous hackathons, including with students overseas. This gives them the much-needed exposure to global talent and best practices.

Friends,

Over the past year, we have witnessed a lot of disruption in different sectors. Much of it is still there. Yet, disruption does not have to mean despair. Instead, we must keep the focus on the twin foundations of repair and prepare. This time last year, the world was still seeking a vaccine. Today, we have quite a few. Similarly, we have to continue repairing health infrastructure and our economies. We in India, implemented huge reforms across sectors, be it mining, space, banking, atomic energy and more. This goes on to show that India as a nation is adaptable and agile, even in the middle of the pandemic. And, when I say - prepare-I mean: Insulating our planet against the next pandemic. Ensuring we focus on sustainable life-styles that stop ecological degradation. Strengthening cooperation in furthering research as well as innovation.

Friends,

The challenges our planet faces can only be overcome with a collective spirit and a human centric approach. For this, I call upon the start-up community to take the lead. The start-up space is dominated by youngsters. These are people free from the baggage of the past. They are best placed to power global transformation. Our start-ups must explore areas such as: Healthcare. Eco-friendly technology including waste recycling, Agriculture, New age tools of learning.

Friends,

As an open society and economy, as a nation committed to the international system, partnerships matter to India. France and Europe are among our key partners. In my conversations with President Macron, In my summit with EU leaders in Porto in May, digital partnership, from start-ups to quantum computing, emerged as a key priority. History has shown that leadership in new technology drives economic strength, jobs and prosperity. But, our partnerships must also serve a larger purpose, in service of humanity. This pandemic is not only a test of our resilience, but also of our imagination. It is a chance to build a more inclusive, caring and sustainable future for all. Like President Macron, I have faith in the power of science and the possibilities of innovation to help us achieve that future.

Thank you.